‘Time Out’ Hong Kong names The Little Red Fox as a MUST!


‘Time Out’ Hong Kong names The Little Red Fox as a MUST!

Moving and grooving in the Hong Kong magazines!

The Little Red Fox is in this months Hong Kongs ‘TIME OUT’ magazine and we are just so over the moon about this!
Read the full Article below:
Airbnb’s surge in popularity in recent years can be explained by the public’s thirst for authentic travel experiences. As a hotel expert, this is an avenue that I rarely get to explore. However, a recent visit to Siem Reap provided me with the perfect opportunity to venture beyond the safe but sometimes stifling confines of hotels to ‘live like a local’ – at least for a weekend.
I made myself at home inside Rattan Cottage (rattancottage.com), a homey duplex with open kitchen, compact bathroom and bijou balcony cosseted by flopping palm fronds. The Cottage’s quiet location in a residential neighbourhood, steps from the Siem Reap River, sits across the street – a relaxed spot appropriately named La Pax (peace) Lane – from Angkor Bodhi Tree Yoga Centre (angkorbodhitree.com), where classes with Romily Case are especially popular. As I stretched into pretzel shapes and returned to the cozy cottage to make myself a mango and banana smoothie, I felt very much like a resident.
Next I hopped in a tuk-tuk to Kandal Village, Siem Reap’s nascent but already buzzing shopping strip and my morning caffeine fix at The Little Red Fox Espresso (fb.com/thefoxespresso) along with a deep bowl of homemade Bircher muesli in coconut milk. The cool eatery unites two Aussie exports – barista Adam Rodwell and his Feel Good Coffee beans (feelgoodcoffeeshop.com), from Cambodia’s lush Mondulkiri province, with Wella professional master colourist David Stirling. After eavesdropping on the local gossip, I grabbed a slice of gluten- free carrot cake and headed upstairs for an ‘alchemy’ treatment from Stirling, an ex-Rockstar Brisbane hair guru. If I really did live here, the keratin-based shampoo and reconstructing conditioner plus hot towel soak and a sleep inducing head massage would become a necessary pleasure.
I would also decorate my Siem Reap address by sourcing Khmer treasures rescued by American graphic designer Douglas Gordon, whose up-cycled countryside chic boutique, Trunkh (trunkh.com), sits just across the street. “We collect old, one-off pieces from all over the provinces,” explains Gordon, as I run my hands along pre-Khmer Rouge carousel animals and children’s toys made of scrap metal. “Everything here has a story.” Next, I meander down the lane to Louise Loubatieres (louiseloubatieres.com) to gaze longingly at blue and white shibori tie-dyed raw silk cushions and Lo-Yuyu ceramics from Prolung Khmer Pottery and Weaving Training Centre (prolungkhmer. blogspot.hk) near Angkor’s 9th century Preah Ko temple.
To get a bit of work done, I headed along the riverfront to The 1961 (the1961.com), which must be the world’s most stylish co-working space. Built during the early years following the country’s independence from France, the airy venue is filled with original art works by local and visiting artists, including co-owner Loven Ramos, who deserves his reputation around town as a creative innovator. Each day I would take my seat among 40 work tables with individual power outlets and make use of the high speed Wi-Fi and printer, while taking coffee breaks at the serviced bar and imagining how the artwork might look back in ‘my’ garden villa across the river. It felt like a situation I could quickly get used to.
Follow Cynthia on Twitter: @CynthiaRoams

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